Three Steps for Getting a 5-star Review

Getting a good review has less to do with your performance than you think, find out how you can get 5-star reviews

By
Nikki Padilla Rivera
|
April 27, 2021
Nikki Padilla Rivera
April 27, 2021

Getting a good review has less to do with your performance than you think.

Yes, the better your tour is, the easier it will be to get that 5-star review, however the average traveler’s expectations are surprisingly low.  So achieving an ‘above and beyond’ tour is very doable.

And while 5-star reviews are certainly required if you’re looking to rise in the algorithm of Marketplaces and OTAs, or get that review bonus from some tour operators, it’s easier to achieve if we can separate a good review from being a measure of our personal quality. 

Don’t leave reviews to chance, be proactive and communicate exactly what you want from your guests with these three steps;

1. Give an amazing tour. 

...People give 5-star reviews to average tours all the time, so it's not going to be that hard to impress them. But impressing them is the key.” 

Guides often underestimate how grateful guests are for a phenomenal experience.  Guests are often desperate to give something to the guides in return (besides that cash tip…) so the better the tour, the easier that ask is.

2. Ask for the review verbally & explain why. 

So many guides feel awkward or aggressive asking for reviews*, but it must be said out loud. Simply emailing them the link [after the tour] is not enough.” 

If the through of asking for a review feels assertive, make some time to hop on a free tour, either in your city or on your next trip.  Free tour guides often live off of the commission on tours they sell so they HAVE to give a hard ask.  Observe the group when they do this, you’ll notice that no-one becomes uncomfortable, no one gets mad, and most importantly, at least a few will usually purchase that extra tour.  Don’t be afraid to ask.

3. Send a follow-up email. 

...I’m a big fan of minimizing the amount of work done by the tour guide outside of the tour...So for me, it's all about using a template, but making it sound as if it's a brand new idea. The trick? Making that email something of value to them.” 

Things that are of value to guests?  A list of places you visited on the tour, some local restaurant recommendations, a handy cheat-sheet of the local language, a list of ‘must-try’ local food, etc.  Keep it simple, something you can copy and paste for each tour so you’re not rewriting the email every time.

Most importantly, put the review reminder at the very top of the email so that they have to scroll past it to get to the value.

For more details and some example templates for follow-up emails, see the full article here.

Sign Up Today

Getting a good review has less to do with your performance than you think.

Yes, the better your tour is, the easier it will be to get that 5-star review, however the average traveler’s expectations are surprisingly low.  So achieving an ‘above and beyond’ tour is very doable.

And while 5-star reviews are certainly required if you’re looking to rise in the algorithm of Marketplaces and OTAs, or get that review bonus from some tour operators, it’s easier to achieve if we can separate a good review from being a measure of our personal quality. 

Don’t leave reviews to chance, be proactive and communicate exactly what you want from your guests with these three steps;

1. Give an amazing tour. 

...People give 5-star reviews to average tours all the time, so it's not going to be that hard to impress them. But impressing them is the key.” 

Guides often underestimate how grateful guests are for a phenomenal experience.  Guests are often desperate to give something to the guides in return (besides that cash tip…) so the better the tour, the easier that ask is.

2. Ask for the review verbally & explain why. 

So many guides feel awkward or aggressive asking for reviews*, but it must be said out loud. Simply emailing them the link [after the tour] is not enough.” 

If the through of asking for a review feels assertive, make some time to hop on a free tour, either in your city or on your next trip.  Free tour guides often live off of the commission on tours they sell so they HAVE to give a hard ask.  Observe the group when they do this, you’ll notice that no-one becomes uncomfortable, no one gets mad, and most importantly, at least a few will usually purchase that extra tour.  Don’t be afraid to ask.

3. Send a follow-up email. 

...I’m a big fan of minimizing the amount of work done by the tour guide outside of the tour...So for me, it's all about using a template, but making it sound as if it's a brand new idea. The trick? Making that email something of value to them.” 

Things that are of value to guests?  A list of places you visited on the tour, some local restaurant recommendations, a handy cheat-sheet of the local language, a list of ‘must-try’ local food, etc.  Keep it simple, something you can copy and paste for each tour so you’re not rewriting the email every time.

Most importantly, put the review reminder at the very top of the email so that they have to scroll past it to get to the value.

For more details and some example templates for follow-up emails, see the full article here.